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Unstable

Sarah Reynolds, Fuyumi Murata

Curated by Adia Sykes

October 6th – 28th, 2018
Opening Reception: October 6th, 2018 from 5–8pm

Sarah H. Reynolds and Fuyumi Murata collaborate on this second iteration of Unstable to once again explore their shared interests in mimicry, ambiguity, and shadows. The first iteration of this project took place in Hiketa, Japan. Using found objects and documentation through photography and painting, these two artists create site specific installations in an attempt to unsettle the viewer’s very idea of what an object is and how it can exist in the world. While Reynolds and Murata were working on the first iteration of this project they would walk the gardens of Japan noting how the very concept of the garden was something incredibly malleable. In one moment it can imagined as a pristine thing, but venture around the bend of a path and one is met with a verdant wilderness. Shape and form come into question as properties of an object that are by no means fixed. Unstable puts the onus of interpretation on the viewer, accounting for the inevitably variable lens through which each individual will encounter an object.

The context of Chicago presents a unique opportunity for this project to exist in a new way. Fuyumi travelled from Japan to collaborate on this site-specific installation. The methodology remains constant, each artist determined to find objects that resonate with them in some way before continuing on to the documentation and installation process.
What presents itself as an object of importance will undoubtedly be informed by both artists’ backgrounds and making practices. Their collaborative work brings together objects that articulate concepts of shape, line, form, shadow, texture, time, and scale in such a way that the final installation sheds light on the multiplicity of meanings that a given object can have should there be space enough for diverse interpretation.

Unstable: not firm or fixed, not constant, prone to change, not stable

– Adia Sykes